CIEH UK releases latest noise complaints statistics for England

10 February 2020, Ross Matthewman

CIEH has today published the results of its flagship noise survey, which provides the only source of information on the vital contribution made by Environmental Health Practitioners (EHPs) working to resolve noise complaints in England.

CIEH NOISE SURVEY 2018/19 REPORT ON FINDINGS – ENGLAND

As the only source of local authority noise complaints data in England, the CIEH survey is a vital resource for public health policy makers. Data from the CIEH survey is being used by Public Health England for the Public Health Outcomes Framework, which establishes an important link between noise and health outcomes.

Key figures for England (figures represent 143 local authorities, 45% of local authorities in England):

  • A total of 143,054 noise complaints were recorded by these local authorities, 61 complaints for every 10,000 people
  • 2,543 notices were served by these local authorities, one notice for every 10,000 people.
  • There were 101 noise-related prosecutions
  • Overall, local authorities allocated 0.2 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) professionals to deal with noise complaints per 10,000 population

Greater London had the highest number of noise complaints, 183 for every 10,000 people, more than double the national average. Local authorities in Greater London also served the most notices, four for every 10,000 people. South West England had the lowest number of noise complaints, roughly half of the national average, at 35 for every 10,000 people. 

Residential noise accounted for the largest proportion of noise complaints. This was the case across all regions in England, except in the South East, where noise from construction, commercial and leisure premises were greater sources of complaints.

Other sources of noise complaints recorded by local authorities include noise from the street, vehicles, machinery and equipment, dogs, agriculture, alarms, military, traffic, aircrafts and railways.

Compared with the last time CIEH collected noise data in 2015/16, the 2018/19 data shows a 9% increase in the number of noise complaints in the 65 local authorities which participated in the survey in both years.

Noise is the single largest issue of complaint made to local authorities in the UK, and according to the World Health Organisation, noise is a disease burden that is second in magnitude only to that from air pollution.

Anne Godfrey, CIEH Chief Executive, said:

“These figures remind us that noise continues to be a major issue of complaint made to local authorities across England.

Noise has profound impacts on people’s health, wellbeing and quality of life. Environmental Health Practitioners (EHPs) are on the frontline of resolving noise complaints and deserve recognition for their important contribution to supporting and protecting the nation’s public health.

I would like to thank all the local authorities which participated in our survey, without whom we would not be able to provide this vital data source. Looking forwards, we plan to continue to collect and use this information to ensure the health impacts of noise are considered in national policy decisions.”

Complaints to the DAA

8000 Complaints per year

Individual made 8,000 noise complaints to Dublin Airport in one year.

Source: Irish Times 4th Feb 2020

Stock photo: Getty

A person who protested about noise at Dublin Airport almost 8,000 times last year contributed to a 10-fold increase in complaints.
The individual accounted for more than half of the total of 15,160 complaints, up from just 1,453 in all of 2018.
And along with another person, they made up almost three-quarters of the total.
Figures published by Dublin Airport Authority show there was an average of 42 complaints a day.
But the prolific complainant from Ongar in north west Dublin made a total of 7,786 complaints – a daily average of 21. This included 4,554 in July alone when he lodged an average of 147 complaints each day.
The other individual filed 3,435 noise complaints.
The DAA said the large increase in complaints last year was skewed by the multiple complaints made by a number of individuals.
An airport spokesperson said the DAA had engaged directly with the two individuals who had made the most numerous complaints.

He pointed out that, for example, the new Airbus A320Neo aircraft that was introduced by Aer Lingus last year generates 50pc less noise than the previous model of the same plane.
According to the DAA, more than 95pc of aircraft using Dublin Airport since 2015 were the quietest type of aircraft compared to 83pc in 2008.
The DAA spokesperson said the reduction of aircraft noise in neighbouring communities was the joint responsibility of Dublin Airport, the Irish Aviation Authority and airlines.
“DAA works closely with all those stakeholders to minimise aircraft noise at the airport,” the spokesperson said.
Figures show that 88pc of complaints last year related to aircraft departures from the main runway taking off in a westerly direction.
The spokesperson said DAA was acutely aware of the concerns of local residents in relation to noise and engaged with them on an ongoing basis. “A balance has to be achieved between those concerns and the needs of the Irish economy,” he added.
Official figures show that 99.2pc of commercial aircraft using Dublin Airport last year kept to the correct flight path on approach and take-off.
Under a noise management plan, most aircraft taking off from Dublin Airport’s main runway must maintain a straight course for five nautical miles before commencing a turn unless otherwise permitted by air traffic controllers.
The DAA operates a €1m noise and flight track monitoring system to ensure minimum disruption to local communities, which includes eight fixed noise monitoring terminals around north Dublin and one mobile monitor.
It said all aircraft operating at Dublin Airport conform to current standards regulated by the International Civil Aviation Organisation.
“As older aircraft are phased out in the short term, this situation will continue to improve,” the spokesperson added.

What are Strategic Noise Maps?

Strategic noise maps are produced using computer software (such as CADNA-A)  that calculates the noise levels from information on  traffic flows (annual AADT figures), rail movements, aircraft movements and industrial noise (yet not  considered in Ireland). It also takes account of topography (ground levels and building  heights) of an area. Computer modelling is used as noise measurement would be prohibitively expensive and could not, over the course of a year, practically cover the large areas and numbers of buildings to comply with the Environmental Noise  Directive. It would also be technically difficult to isolate the different noise sources i.e. road traffic, aircraft traffic and rail traffic. The noise maps are contour maps showing areas of differing levels of noise at a height of 4m above ground, for an average day in the year for individual sources i.e road traffic railway traffic, aircraft in flight of industry (had it been plotted in Ireland). For urban areas these can  be combined into one map to give an overall picture of the noise climate.

rail noise

 

One person files over 3,100 complaints about Dublin Airport noise in six months

Repeat objectors responsible for an almost-tenfold increase in such complaints

Most complaints are made by people living on Dublin’s northside in areas located on or close to flight paths, including The Ward, Portmarnock and St Margaret’s. Photograph: Getty Images

A number of repeat objectors are responsible for an almost-tenfold increase in complaints about noise from aircraft using Dublin Airport in the first half of 2019.

Figures published by the DAA, the airport’s operator, show one individual has filed over 3,100 complaints over the six months.

The individual, who lives in Ongar, West Dublin, had made 3,147 complaints about noise from aircraft between January and June – approximately 82 per cent of all complaints recorded over the period – and an average of more than 17 complaints per day.

The same person was also single-handedly responsible for a 22 per cent increase in overall noise complaints to the DAA in 2018 when they registered 628 incidents.

Two other individuals – one from The Ward and another Ongar resident – have each filed more than 100 complaints in the first half of this year.

Overall, a total of 3,817 noise complaints have been lodged with the DAA from just over 100 individuals over the period compared to 396 complaints over the corresponding timeframe last year.

The DAA claims the figures are skewed by a significant number of complaints from a few individuals. If such repeat objectors are excluded, the DAA estimates the number of complaints in the first half of 2019 is around 330.

Daylight hours

The vast majority of cases relate to complaints about noise from aircraft taking off from the main 10/28 runway during daylight hours.

Most complaints are made by people living on Dublin’s northside in areas located on or close to flights paths including The Ward, Portmarnock and St Margaret’s, but some have been received from residents as far away as Celbridge and Maynooth, Co Kildare, Newcastle, Co Wicklow and Tallaghtand Sallynoggin on the city’s southside.

A DAA spokeswoman said more than 99 per cent of commercial flights adhere to the dedicated flight path on take-off and approach at Dublin Airport.

The spokeswoman said the DAA had contacted the Irish Aviation Authority(IAA) to ascertain if anything had changed regarding flight paths to explain the increase in complaints.

“We are both puzzled as to what has changed over Ongar since the first complaint came in July 2018, as the current flight procedures/path have remained the same for at least the past 15 years,” she said. “Aircraft are typically between 5,000 and 10,000 feet when they are given direction by the IAA to turn south over Ongar.”

Ongar lies a considerable distance outside a zone where householders can avail of a free noise insulation scheme for their homes.

However, the DAA acknowledged that the number of flights had increased over the period.

Most aircraft, which depart from the main runway in a westerly direction, must maintain a straight course for five nautical miles before commencing a turn.

Operating restrictions

The DAA said all aircraft taking off and landing in Dublin were compliant with current standards set down by the International Civil Aviation Organisationon aircraft noise, noise abatement measures and operating restrictions.

It claimed that modern subsonic jets were around 30 decibels quieter than their first-generation counterparts, which represents a 90 per cent reduction in perceived noise.

And over 90 per cent of aircraft using Dublin last year were the quietest types compared to 83 per cent in 2008 and 46 per cent in 2003.

The DAA said it worked closely with the IAA and airlines to constantly heighten awareness of noise abatement procedures in force at Dublin Airport.

The DAA operates a €1m noise and flight track monitoring system to ensure minimum disruption to local communities which includes eight fixed noise monitors and one mobile noise monitor around north Dublin.

Construction work is currently under way on the new €320 million North Runway at Dublin Airport, which is scheduled to come into operation in 2022.

The DAA is seeking to amend the existing planning permissions for the runway, which will prohibit its use for landings and take-offs between 11pm and 7am.

Fingal County Council has recently been appointed as the competent authority for independently assessing noise controls and restrictions at Dublin Airport.

Source: Irish Times

CIEH Noise Survey 2019 (UK)

A very progressive move by the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health in the UK.

The survey will be open until 31 July 2019

This year the survey is being supported by RH Environmental (RHE).

Why is CIEH noise survey important?

This noise survey provides the only source of regular national information on the important contribution made by environmental health professionals working to resolve noise and noise nuisance complaints.

Some of the data from CIEH’s survey has also been adopted into the Public Health Outcomes Framework which is administered by Public Health England (PHE). This provides an important link between noise and health outcomes. As the department responsible for setting national policy on noise, Department for the Environment, Food, Rural Affairs, also draw on CIEH data on noise. The data was also referenced in the Chief Medical Officer annual report of 2017 to emphasise the importance of noise as a public health issue.

We will also be using the data to engage with Welsh Government, to try and establish a stronger understanding of the links between noise and public health.

How will we use this data?

We will be sharing the data received with colleagues at DEFRA and PHE. CIEH will also use it to inform media press releases to highlight the work of EHPs.

What has changed?

CIEH has been running its noise survey since 2000 and collecting noise data from local authorities for much longer than that. However, with the response rates slowly dropping over recent years, we took a break last year in order to improve the survey and make it easier and simpler to submit.

How you can help

By providing us with information on the number of noise complaints received in a 12 month period and your work to resolve these in your local area. We are interested in as much or as little data you can provide – everything is useful.

Who would we like data from?

We are only collecting data from England and Wales. This is because Northern Ireland and Scotland have their own data collections systems in place, led by central Government. No such collections exist in England and Wales.

What data do I have to provide?

We will ask you some basic questions about which LA you’re submitting data for and the timeframe the data is for (financial year or other).

Minimum required information:

  • Total number of noise complaints received
  • Total number of notices served
  • Staffing levels for noise related work

Additional (optional) information:

  • Total number of prosecutions
  • The size of the population served by the LA
  • Breakdowns of noise complaints by sector

If you have any difficulties completing this survey or need to contact us for any reason, please email: policy@cieh.org

International Noise Awareness Day

Its International Noise Awareness Day today…..

All over the world, people, organizations, and governments will commemorate the 24th Annual International Noise Awareness Day (INAD) on Wednesday, April 24, 2019.

Eco Eye Diarmuid Keaney

Do you have a noise issue? Why not log it on Ireland’s ONLY noise complaint website to help increase NOISE AWARENESS.

Noise Complaints fall in Burlington.

Noise complaints fall in Burlington – but Hill Area is still the loudest

Houses in Burlington’s Hill Section. Seen here on March 18, 2019.
JESS ALOE/FREE PRESS

Burlington is getting quieter.

Between 2012 and 2018, the number of noise complaints the Burlington police responded to fell by more than half.

Burlington Police Department data shows 775 incidents flagged as “noise” last year, just about 1,000 fewer calls than in 2012.

Incidents responded to by the Burlington Police Department flagged as “noise” types. Data from the Burlington Police Department.
JESS ALOE/FREE PRESS

The biggest reduction came from the city’s noisiest neighborhood — the University/Hill Section. In 2012, the University of Vermont partnered with the city’s Code Enforcement Office and police to quiet the neighborhood through increased police patrols and outreach to landlords of “problem properties.”

The university also pays for the police to step up patrols in the area during typically problematic times.

Restorative Noise program

Rachel Jolly runs Burlington’s Restorative Noise program, which allows residents who receive noise tickets for parties — called “social noise” — to reduce the amount of the fine by participating in a two-hour session and doing community service.

More: Quiet UVM students make good neighbors

The session, she said, gives offenders the chance to build a deeper sense of connection with their neighborhoods.

Materials for UVM’s “Have a Heart campaign, which uses a child’s drawing and chocolates to encourage students to keep noise down
JESS ALOE/FREE PRESS

“So often, the ticket receivers are college students who came from other communities,” she said.

Non-“social noise” offenders can also reduce their fines by doing community service, but Jolly said the majority of the cases she sees stem from parties.

More: Police tout foot patrol success in student areas

They’ve seen a dramatic decrease in the past few years. From 2010 to 2015, the program averaged 88 noise cases per year. Last year, they handled 8.

Noise by the numbers – 2012 to 2018

Noisiest neighborhood: The University/Hill Section. Nearly half of all noise complaints — 47 percent — came from the student-heavy area around the University of Vermont.

Quietest neighborhood: The New North End. Just under 6 percent of all noise issues originated in the Queen City’s northern reaches.

Noisiest months: August and September. Noise incidents tend to peak in the early fall, as students return to school and some move off-campus for the first time.

Noisiest day of the week: Saturday, though Friday and Sunday also generated high numbers of complaints.

More: Burlington’s student-dense Ward 8 works get out the vote on Town Meeting Day

Tips for a respectful party

The Burlington Community Justice Center offers several tips for “respectful parties.”

  • Tell your neighbors you’ll be hosting a party, and give them your phone number so they can call you if it gets too loud.
  • Invite only a manageable number of guests. Turn away people you don’t know.
  • Minimize gatherings on front porches and yards after 10 p.m.
  • Keep windows closed.
  • Walk around outside to check the noise level.

Contact Jess Aloe at 802-660-1874 or jaloe@freepressmedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @jess_aloe

Noise complaints Maynooth

Noise from parties a constant problem in Maynooth estates – Kildare court told.

Noise from parties a constant problem in Maynooth estates - Kildare court told

Noise from house parties is a constant problem in estates in Maynooth, gardai told Kilcock District Court on March 5 during a hearing into a noise related incident in the town.

Garda Sergeant Jim Kelly told Judge Desmond Zaidan that noise from houses is an environmental issue and should be reported to the county council.

Asked by the judge what the gardai did when they were called out, Sgt Kelly said they asked people politely to turn the music down.

“It is a constant problem in Maynooth,” he said.

Sgt Kelly was commenting just before Judge Zaidan applied the Probation Act in the case of a 46-year-old Maynooth man, who was prosecuted following threats over noise levels at a house next door.

Justin O’Keefe, 23 Greenfield Drive, Maynooth, had been charged with threatening to damage property at 22 Greenfield Drive on the Sunday evening of November 26 2017.

Last October, the court heard that Mr O’Keefe, who has young children, sought to have noise reduced at a rented house next door to him and lost his temper with the tenants, threatening to do damage.

However, he did not follow through on his threat.

Mr O’Keefe had called the gardai previously in relation to the noise. The court heard Mr O’Keefe could bring a case in the District Court under Section 108 of the Environment Protection Act but that gardai could not force people to turn down music at 1am in the morning.

Judge Zaidan said Mr O’Keefe was “pushed to extremes.”

On March 5, David Powderly, solicitor for Mr O’Keefe said neither the landlord nor the tenants wanted to get involved in a restorative justice process.

The judge applied the Probation

 

Source: Leinster Leader, to read the article, click here.