Report Released (2018-2020)

Noise Complaint Statistics for the Republic of Ireland 2018-2020, issued on the 30th of June 2020. Click on the report below to download a copy.

The purpose of this document is to assist decision-makers, government agencies and public bodies on matters pertaining to noise in the Republic of Ireland.

 

Noise-Complaints-Ireland

 

Lockdown noise complaints Double.

Lockdown sees noise complaints about neighbours more than double in Derry

Lockdown sees noise complaints about neighbours more than double in Derry

 

Source: Derry Now(Staff Reporter)

Derry City and Strabane District Council have encouraged the public to be respectful and considerate after noise complaints from music, tv and parties being held in homes more than doubled in recent months compared to this time last year.

The Clean Neighbourhoods and Environment Act (Northern Ireland) 2011 gives powers to council to investigate noise which is giving rise to complaint.

Council will investigate noise complaints which may be emanating from domestic, commercial, entertainment and industrial premises, however, Council does not investigate anonymous complaints.

Mayor of Derry City and Strabane District Council, Brian Tierney, urged everyone to think more about how they can reduce noise pollution.

“Under the current circumstances, people are spending more time at home than ever before, and unfortunately that has led to more noise complaints being received by Council from across our district.

“After receiving information on the worrying rise of this type of noise complaint, I would strongly urge people to think of how their behaviour could be affecting their neighbours and their community.

“Whether it is keeping an eye on your pets, or avoiding playing loud music, we can all take steps in reducing noise pollution – which can take place at any time of the day or night.

“I would also ask people to bear in mind that restrictions still remain in place around social distancing and hosting gatherings in your home.

“This rise in noise complaints is something that we have to tackle head on for the benefit of everyone in our district, so I implore all to please be considerate and follow the extensive advice available.”

To report ongoing noise, you can call 028 71253253.

Findings Report Imminent June 2020

We are pleased to announce that a ‘findings report’ will be issued in June 2020  based on public noise complaint data collected and compiled on this website since its inception in 2018.

It is proposed that the data collected will be anonymised and presented in a form that will allow Agencies, Local Authorities and relevant Government Departments to better understand the nature of noise complaints in Ireland. It is proposed that the report will be presented to the Irish Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment (DCCAE) to assist in influencing how noise is considered in future years and to assist with the development of future noise policy within the Republic of Ireland.

The data gathered has been compiled, anonymised, interpreted and presented by Ms Amy Keaney (of the National University of Ireland) as part of an on-going private research project. This research remains the first of its kind ever undertaken within the Republic of Ireland.

Noise Complaint Ireland

If you are an interested party or would like to get involved in this on-going research, please complete the form below and we will be in touch.

Noise App UK Covid 19 Noise Complaints

Data from The Noise App suggests that noise complaints in the UK have surged by more than 48% since the Covid-19 lockdown was announced. According to the data collected by The Noise App, members of the public are reporting a massive increase in unwanted noise from their neighbours. The Noise App is  used by 240 local authorities and housing associations across the UK. This represents about a quarter of the UK population and provides a snapshot of what is actually going on at home since the lockdown.

To read more, click on the link below:

https://www.rheglobal.com/news/614913981658890240/noise-complaints-surge-during-covid-19-lockdown

CIEH UK releases latest noise complaints statistics for England

10 February 2020, Ross Matthewman

CIEH has today published the results of its flagship noise survey, which provides the only source of information on the vital contribution made by Environmental Health Practitioners (EHPs) working to resolve noise complaints in England.

CIEH NOISE SURVEY 2018/19 REPORT ON FINDINGS – ENGLAND

As the only source of local authority noise complaints data in England, the CIEH survey is a vital resource for public health policy makers. Data from the CIEH survey is being used by Public Health England for the Public Health Outcomes Framework, which establishes an important link between noise and health outcomes.

Key figures for England (figures represent 143 local authorities, 45% of local authorities in England):

  • A total of 143,054 noise complaints were recorded by these local authorities, 61 complaints for every 10,000 people
  • 2,543 notices were served by these local authorities, one notice for every 10,000 people.
  • There were 101 noise-related prosecutions
  • Overall, local authorities allocated 0.2 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) professionals to deal with noise complaints per 10,000 population

Greater London had the highest number of noise complaints, 183 for every 10,000 people, more than double the national average. Local authorities in Greater London also served the most notices, four for every 10,000 people. South West England had the lowest number of noise complaints, roughly half of the national average, at 35 for every 10,000 people. 

Residential noise accounted for the largest proportion of noise complaints. This was the case across all regions in England, except in the South East, where noise from construction, commercial and leisure premises were greater sources of complaints.

Other sources of noise complaints recorded by local authorities include noise from the street, vehicles, machinery and equipment, dogs, agriculture, alarms, military, traffic, aircrafts and railways.

Compared with the last time CIEH collected noise data in 2015/16, the 2018/19 data shows a 9% increase in the number of noise complaints in the 65 local authorities which participated in the survey in both years.

Noise is the single largest issue of complaint made to local authorities in the UK, and according to the World Health Organisation, noise is a disease burden that is second in magnitude only to that from air pollution.

Anne Godfrey, CIEH Chief Executive, said:

“These figures remind us that noise continues to be a major issue of complaint made to local authorities across England.

Noise has profound impacts on people’s health, wellbeing and quality of life. Environmental Health Practitioners (EHPs) are on the frontline of resolving noise complaints and deserve recognition for their important contribution to supporting and protecting the nation’s public health.

I would like to thank all the local authorities which participated in our survey, without whom we would not be able to provide this vital data source. Looking forwards, we plan to continue to collect and use this information to ensure the health impacts of noise are considered in national policy decisions.”

Complaints to the DAA

8000 Complaints per year

Individual made 8,000 noise complaints to Dublin Airport in one year.

Source: Irish Times 4th Feb 2020

Stock photo: Getty

A person who protested about noise at Dublin Airport almost 8,000 times last year contributed to a 10-fold increase in complaints.
The individual accounted for more than half of the total of 15,160 complaints, up from just 1,453 in all of 2018.
And along with another person, they made up almost three-quarters of the total.
Figures published by Dublin Airport Authority show there was an average of 42 complaints a day.
But the prolific complainant from Ongar in north west Dublin made a total of 7,786 complaints – a daily average of 21. This included 4,554 in July alone when he lodged an average of 147 complaints each day.
The other individual filed 3,435 noise complaints.
The DAA said the large increase in complaints last year was skewed by the multiple complaints made by a number of individuals.
An airport spokesperson said the DAA had engaged directly with the two individuals who had made the most numerous complaints.

He pointed out that, for example, the new Airbus A320Neo aircraft that was introduced by Aer Lingus last year generates 50pc less noise than the previous model of the same plane.
According to the DAA, more than 95pc of aircraft using Dublin Airport since 2015 were the quietest type of aircraft compared to 83pc in 2008.
The DAA spokesperson said the reduction of aircraft noise in neighbouring communities was the joint responsibility of Dublin Airport, the Irish Aviation Authority and airlines.
“DAA works closely with all those stakeholders to minimise aircraft noise at the airport,” the spokesperson said.
Figures show that 88pc of complaints last year related to aircraft departures from the main runway taking off in a westerly direction.
The spokesperson said DAA was acutely aware of the concerns of local residents in relation to noise and engaged with them on an ongoing basis. “A balance has to be achieved between those concerns and the needs of the Irish economy,” he added.
Official figures show that 99.2pc of commercial aircraft using Dublin Airport last year kept to the correct flight path on approach and take-off.
Under a noise management plan, most aircraft taking off from Dublin Airport’s main runway must maintain a straight course for five nautical miles before commencing a turn unless otherwise permitted by air traffic controllers.
The DAA operates a €1m noise and flight track monitoring system to ensure minimum disruption to local communities, which includes eight fixed noise monitoring terminals around north Dublin and one mobile monitor.
It said all aircraft operating at Dublin Airport conform to current standards regulated by the International Civil Aviation Organisation.
“As older aircraft are phased out in the short term, this situation will continue to improve,” the spokesperson added.

What are Strategic Noise Maps?

Strategic noise maps are produced using computer software (such as CADNA-A)  that calculates the noise levels from information on  traffic flows (annual AADT figures), rail movements, aircraft movements and industrial noise (yet not  considered in Ireland). It also takes account of topography (ground levels and building  heights) of an area. Computer modelling is used as noise measurement would be prohibitively expensive and could not, over the course of a year, practically cover the large areas and numbers of buildings to comply with the Environmental Noise  Directive. It would also be technically difficult to isolate the different noise sources i.e. road traffic, aircraft traffic and rail traffic. The noise maps are contour maps showing areas of differing levels of noise at a height of 4m above ground, for an average day in the year for individual sources i.e road traffic railway traffic, aircraft in flight of industry (had it been plotted in Ireland). For urban areas these can  be combined into one map to give an overall picture of the noise climate.

rail noise

 

One person files over 3,100 complaints about Dublin Airport noise in six months

Repeat objectors responsible for an almost-tenfold increase in such complaints

Most complaints are made by people living on Dublin’s northside in areas located on or close to flight paths, including The Ward, Portmarnock and St Margaret’s. Photograph: Getty Images

A number of repeat objectors are responsible for an almost-tenfold increase in complaints about noise from aircraft using Dublin Airport in the first half of 2019.

Figures published by the DAA, the airport’s operator, show one individual has filed over 3,100 complaints over the six months.

The individual, who lives in Ongar, West Dublin, had made 3,147 complaints about noise from aircraft between January and June – approximately 82 per cent of all complaints recorded over the period – and an average of more than 17 complaints per day.

The same person was also single-handedly responsible for a 22 per cent increase in overall noise complaints to the DAA in 2018 when they registered 628 incidents.

Two other individuals – one from The Ward and another Ongar resident – have each filed more than 100 complaints in the first half of this year.

Overall, a total of 3,817 noise complaints have been lodged with the DAA from just over 100 individuals over the period compared to 396 complaints over the corresponding timeframe last year.

The DAA claims the figures are skewed by a significant number of complaints from a few individuals. If such repeat objectors are excluded, the DAA estimates the number of complaints in the first half of 2019 is around 330.

Daylight hours

The vast majority of cases relate to complaints about noise from aircraft taking off from the main 10/28 runway during daylight hours.

Most complaints are made by people living on Dublin’s northside in areas located on or close to flights paths including The Ward, Portmarnock and St Margaret’s, but some have been received from residents as far away as Celbridge and Maynooth, Co Kildare, Newcastle, Co Wicklow and Tallaghtand Sallynoggin on the city’s southside.

A DAA spokeswoman said more than 99 per cent of commercial flights adhere to the dedicated flight path on take-off and approach at Dublin Airport.

The spokeswoman said the DAA had contacted the Irish Aviation Authority(IAA) to ascertain if anything had changed regarding flight paths to explain the increase in complaints.

“We are both puzzled as to what has changed over Ongar since the first complaint came in July 2018, as the current flight procedures/path have remained the same for at least the past 15 years,” she said. “Aircraft are typically between 5,000 and 10,000 feet when they are given direction by the IAA to turn south over Ongar.”

Ongar lies a considerable distance outside a zone where householders can avail of a free noise insulation scheme for their homes.

However, the DAA acknowledged that the number of flights had increased over the period.

Most aircraft, which depart from the main runway in a westerly direction, must maintain a straight course for five nautical miles before commencing a turn.

Operating restrictions

The DAA said all aircraft taking off and landing in Dublin were compliant with current standards set down by the International Civil Aviation Organisationon aircraft noise, noise abatement measures and operating restrictions.

It claimed that modern subsonic jets were around 30 decibels quieter than their first-generation counterparts, which represents a 90 per cent reduction in perceived noise.

And over 90 per cent of aircraft using Dublin last year were the quietest types compared to 83 per cent in 2008 and 46 per cent in 2003.

The DAA said it worked closely with the IAA and airlines to constantly heighten awareness of noise abatement procedures in force at Dublin Airport.

The DAA operates a €1m noise and flight track monitoring system to ensure minimum disruption to local communities which includes eight fixed noise monitors and one mobile noise monitor around north Dublin.

Construction work is currently under way on the new €320 million North Runway at Dublin Airport, which is scheduled to come into operation in 2022.

The DAA is seeking to amend the existing planning permissions for the runway, which will prohibit its use for landings and take-offs between 11pm and 7am.

Fingal County Council has recently been appointed as the competent authority for independently assessing noise controls and restrictions at Dublin Airport.

Source: Irish Times